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Surrealist Art Posters Calendars 2013

Surrealist Art Posters Calendars

Joan Miro and Salvador Dali are two of the artists from the surrealist movement whose work has survived till today. Salvador Dali, with his flamboyant lifestyle, is best remembered. The word ‘surrealism’ brings to mind his dreamy half realistic work with dripping clocks and elephants on stilts. Joan Miro’s work was more abstract in nature, using nearly primary colors and shapes like lines and circles. Yet both were artists in the surrealism movement of the 1920’s. Gathered on this page you will find poster calendars featuring the work of a variety of Surrealist artists.

Featured first is the Magritte Poster Calendar 2013. His surrealism is often to do with language, like his famous ‘ce n’est pas un pipe’ (this is not a pipe). Shown here is a dove in front of a face – disconcerting? Well, that’s probably precisely what Magritte aimed at achieving in his viewers.

Is Paul Klee considered a Surrealist? I’m not sure. His most famous art is probably closer to cubism. Still, I love the colors in this piece from the 2013 Paul Klee Poster Calendar.

If you want more than the standard set of Surrealists on your kitchen wall, the Surrealisten 2013 poster calendar by three German Museums may be just the thing. Surrealisten is German for, you guessed it, Surrealism.

Poster calendars are distinguished by their large posters and the lack of room to write down much. Still, each month you will find the dates of that month included. The pages in these large-format calendars are stunning enough to be framed and mounted on their own. The first two are published by teNeues and include multi-lingual introduction and a European linear calendarium. The exception is the Frida Kahlo de Rivera poster calendar. It’s published by the equally famous publisher Taschen.

Kahlo 2012 Poster Calendar
Kahlo’s arresting pictures, most of them small format self-portraits, express the burdens that weighed upon her soul. This poster calendar features a dozen Kahlo prints on premium textured paper. Perforation allows you to easily remove the prints for framing.

Miro 2012 Super Poster Calendar
Twelve works from Spanish painter Joan Miro are featured in this 2012 Miro Super Poster Calendar. The super large size provides a perfect backdrop for some of Miro’s most enduring images in poster format. Miro favored a surrealism approach to painting and his images challenge us to look within.

Dali 2012 Poster Calendar

Dali 2012 Poster Calendar

Dali 2012 Poster Calendar 
It’s hard to choose from the thousands of images created by Salvador Dali, but the twelve images in the 2012 Dali Poster Calendar don’t disappoint as you move through the months.

Magritte 2012 Poster Calendar 
Twelve of Belgian Surrealist artist Rene Magritte’s works are featured in this 2012 Magritte Super Poster Calendar. Gritty, witty and thought-provoking, a Magritte image is sure to cause comment by all who see it and this lovely collection will provide a new discussion point wherever displayed.
Warning, not all images are family friendly.

2011 Surrealist Art Posters are still available (while supplies last)

Miro 2011 Poster Calendar

Frida Kahlo de Rivera (July 6, 1907 – July 13, 1954; born Magdalena Carmen Frieda Kahlo y Calderón) was a Mexican painter, born in Coyoacán. Perhaps best known for her self-portraits, Kahlo’s work is remembered for its “pain and passion”, and its intense, vibrant colors. Her work has been celebrated in Mexico as emblematic of national and indigenous tradition, and by feminists for its uncompromising depiction of the female experience and form.

Mexican culture and Amerindian cultural tradition figure prominently in her work, which has sometimes been characterized as Naïve art or folk art. Her work has also been described as “surrealist”, and in 1938 one surrealist described Kahlo herself as a “ribbon around a bomb”.

Kahlo had a stormy but passionate marriage with the prominent Mexican artist Diego Rivera. She suffered lifelong health problems, many of which stemmed from a traffic accident in her teenage years. These issues are reflected in her works, more than half of which are self-portraits of one sort or another. Kahlo suggested, “I paint myself because I am so often alone and because I am the subject I know best.”

Surrealism is defined as using the real (aka realism) and turning it on it’s head into something that is NOT realistic at all. The difference with abstract art is that in surrealism we (generally) do see something we can recognize from the real world. With this definition it’s a bit puzzling that Frieda Kahlo’s work is considered ‘surrealistic’, but it is – we can’t argue with the experts, can we?

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