Jewish Calendars, Planners and Date Books 2016, 2017

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Real Jewish Calendars feature not just Jewish artwork, or Hebrew terminology: they are also customized to help you keep track of the Jewish year, religious holidays etc. The best of them are beautiful as well as functional.

This collection of Jewish calendars and planners should help you find a great addition to your kitchen: inspiring and a great way to keep track of those ‘to do’s’ that wall calendars are so helpful for.

Above is The Jewish Engagement Calendar: Jewish Year 5774/5775 by the New York Jewish Museum. This best selling Jewish Planner includes full-color illustrations of Judaic ceremonial masterpieces along with selections from the Jewish Museum’s exceptional fine art collection.

This gorgeous selection of Judaica and fine art from The Jewish Museum in New York features a great variety of Jewish treasures, including Judaica, paintings, sculptures, and photographs.

The calendar spans a full 16 months from September to the end of December of the next (normal) calendar year and includes US and Jewish holidays, Sabbath candle-lighting times plus a list of Jewish holidays through to the year 2026.

Jews and Judaism

The Jewish people are an ancient tribe that started it’s long history in the Middle East. Their history goes back at least 3000 years.

Understanding Judaism starts with understanding the tribal origins of this people.

During much of those 3000 years Jews lived in what’s now Israel and Palestine. Their language was Hebrew, which is a Semitic language, akin to Arabic and Aramaic.

Currently Jews live all over the world in what’s called the ‘Diaspora’. In Northern Europe they spoke Yiddish, which is still spoken in small communities in the US, while in Southern Europe they spoke Ladino (Judeo-Spanish).

Hebrew Illuminations Wall Calendar – 16 Months September -December the following year

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This 16 month calendar, features ornate, highly detailed Judaic paintings in watercolor, colored pencil and acrylic, all created by Jewish artist Adam Rhine.

This unique calendar features illustrations of the Yom Tovim, which are Holy Days significant to the Jewish faith.

Size Closed: 12.0 ” x 12.0 “

Yiddish Phrase-A-Day Desk Calendar – 365 Day Calendar9455113_f520

Learn a new Yiddish phrase every day of the year. How about ” From beautiful day (sheyner tog!) to I love youI (kh hob dir lib)!!

Easy pronunciations and clear definitions are included.

Jewish Celebrations Wall Calendar61VK76W3WGL

Malcah Zeldis ios an Artist who creates brilliant paintings that capture the living spirit of Jewish tradition, which are based on her own childhood memories, formed from her experiences living in various Orthodox neighborhoods and the years she spent in Israel.

This 16 month calendar runs from September through until the end of December and features everyday rituals to annual ceremonies to once-in-a-lifetime events. The calendar also includes Jewish holidays, days of the Jewish year, weekly Torah readings and a list of candle lighting times for selected cities.

Israel Wall Calendar9455126_f520

Enjoy Photographs of beautiful Israel. Israel is home to various sacred, archaeological and historical sites; sun-drenched beaches along the Mediterranean, Red Sea, Dead Sea, and the Sea of Galilee; amazing mountains.

The Jewish Museum Art Wall Calendar – Religion & Inspirational,Religion & Spirituality Jewish

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The beautiful and fascinating paintings, prints, textiles, and ceremonial objects reproduced in this sixteen-month calendar reveal different aspects of Jewish culture. Spanning several continents and nearly three centuries, these works, from The Jewish Museum in New York City, speak powerfully about the Jewish experience in the world.

The Jewish Museum calendar covers September through December (Elul through Tevet). It helps you keep track of major and minor Jewish holidays, find weekly Torah readings and candle lighting times, and gives blessings to be recited over the candles.

Jewish Holidays on the Jewish Calendar

Jews, as a people and as a religious congregations, share a set of holidays and festivals: holy or secular commemoration of an important event in Jewish history. In Hebrew, Jewish holidays and festivals, depending on their nature, may be called yom tov (“good day”) (Yiddish: yontif) or chag (“festival”) or ta’anit (“fast”).

Most of the calendars and date books on this page will tell you the exact date of these holidays in the year. Since the Jewish calendar is based on the lunar calendar, the dates are never fixed within the Gregorian calendar.

The origins of various Jewish holidays generally can be found in Torah mitzvot (commandments), rabbinical mandate, and modern Israeli history.

One of the most important of Jewish holidays is Rosh Hashanah: The Jewish New Year. This is sometimes a one day holiday, but for others it’s a two day celebration: depending on the variety of Judaism. It starts one of four hebrew calendars. To give you an idea, it starts at sunset, September 8 in 2010 and ends at sunset, September 10.

The ten days after that are known as: Aseret Yemei Teshuva: Ten Days of Repentance. Observing Jews will fast and do additional supplications, confessing one’s deeds before God, all this leading to self-reflection.

THE most important Jewish holiday is Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. This is the last day of fasting of the ten days of repentance. It’s observed by all religious Jews and many secular Jews as well.

Jewish Holidays on the Jewish Calendar

Jews, as a people and as a religious congregations, share a set of holidays and festivals: holy or secular commemoration of an important event in Jewish history. In Hebrew, Jewish holidays and festivals, depending on their nature, may be called yom tov (“good day”) (Yiddish: yontif) or chag (“festival”) or ta’anit (“fast”).

Most of the calendars and date books on this page will tell you the exact date of these holidays in the year. Since the Jewish calendar is based on the lunar calendar, the dates are never fixed within the Gregorian calendar.

The origins of various Jewish holidays generally can be found in Torah mitzvot (commandments), rabbinical mandate, and modern Israeli history.

One of the most important of Jewish holidays is Rosh Hashanah: The Jewish New Year. This is sometimes a one day holiday, but for others it’s a two day celebration: depending on the variety of Judaism. It starts one of four hebrew calendars. To give you an idea, it starts at sunset, September 8 in 2010 and ends at sunset, September 10.

The ten days after that are known as: Aseret Yemei Teshuva: Ten Days of Repentance. Observing Jews will fast and do additional supplications, confessing one’s deeds before God, all this leading to self-reflection.

THE most important Jewish holiday according to many is Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. This is the last day of fasting of the ten days of repentance. It’s observed by all religious Jews and many secular Jews as well.

Hanukkah (also spelled Chanukah), also known as the Festival of Lights, is an eight-day Jewish holiday commemorating the rededication of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt of the 2nd century BCE. Hanukkah is observed for eight nights and may occur from late November to late December on the Gregorian calendar.

Purim is a festival that commemorates the deliverance of the Jewish people of the ancient Persian Empire from Haman’s plot to annihilate them, as recorded in the Biblical Book of Esther (Megillat Esther). According to the story, Haman cast lots to determine the day upon which to exterminate the Jews.

Purim is celebrated annually according to the Hebrew calendar on the 14th day of the Hebrew month of Adar (Adar II in leap years), the day following the victory of the Jews over their enemies; On Purim the Book of Esther is publicly read, and people give mutual gifts of food and drink, give charity to the poor and eat a celebratory meal.

Passover (Hebrew, Yiddish: Pesach, Israeli: Pesah, Pesakh, Yiddish: Peysekh, Paysakh) is a Jewish and Samaritan holy day and festival commemorating the Hebrews’ escape from enslavement in Egypt.

It is the holiday Jesus was celebrating when he ate his last supper. In the story of the Exodus, the Bible tells that God inflicted ten plagues upon the Egyptians before Pharaoh would release his Hebrew slaves, with the tenth plague being the killing of all of the firstborn, from the Pharaoh’s son to the firstborn of the dungeon captive, to the firstborn of cattle. The Hebrews were instructed to mark the doorposts of their homes with the blood of a spring lamb and, upon seeing this, the spirit of the Lord passed over these homes, hence the term “passover”. When Pharaoh freed the Hebrews, it is said that they left in such a hurry that they could not wait for bread to rise. In commemoration, for the duration of Passover, no leavened bread is eaten, for which reason it is called “The Festival of the Unleavened Bread”. Matza (unleavened bread) is the primary symbol of the holiday. This bread that is flat and unrisen is called Matzo.

The secular Israeli holidays instituted in Israel include:

  • Yom Yerushalayim — Jerusalem day
  • Yom HaShoah — Holocaust Remembrance day
  • Yom Hazikaron — Memorial Day
  • Yom Ha’atzmaut — Israel Independence Day
Posted on Categories Religion & Inspiration